Thursday, November 02, 2006

A Trip to the Papers

We went on a courtesy call to another newspaper today. This was a paper with a slightly smaller circulation, but with its own niche audience. While we waited for the editors to get ready, we were taken on a mini-tour of the paper. We visited the press where the newspaper is printed. Call me a child, but I was giddy with excitement at seeing the papers roll off the press. The smoke and smell would take some getting used to - well, no actually I don't want to have to breathe in those noxious fumes everyday.

Next, we went to the newsroom. It was still early - about 11am (yes, many reporters work into the wee hours of the morning and so roll into work late the next day). Now, THAT sounds like my kind of job (though I suppose a deep interest and knowledge of current affairs would sort of be a pre-requisiste). Most of the staff in the newsroom appeared to be part of the production team. Some were typing in stories, while others worked on the layout and photos. Even though the room was near empty, I could easily picture the room filled with reporters talking, working on their articles and following unfolding news stories simultaneously. So exciting!!!!

5 comments:

d said...

nigerian papers need to introduce a shift system like the international press has. that way there's someone at work at all hours. news happens all the time.

Nkem said...

D, you're on the money. There's always someone at work. And even daily newspaper reports don't report as late as 11am, meeting on the next edition's agenda would have been finished by then. I'm currently at the BBC World Service, and I'll give you a rundown of the hours various shifts start: 0630, 0730, 0930, 1130, 1730, 2130. That's just news production, but there's also news writing, and programmes. It's rolling news and different from print, but the building is never empty, and 11am is too late not to be in the office. One can only assuming that newspapers in Nigeria go to print later than in the UK. Here, the papers are out promptly after midnight. I used to think journalism was a sitting-by-the-pool-sangria-sipping profession, but it's bloody hard work...

uknaija said...

I was going to say that it's probably not as romantic as it seems but the pros beat me to it...but I know exactly what you mean about the excitement of the newsroom to an outsider

d said...

nigerian journalists don't report news, they report politics. so they can afford to roll in at 11, cause that's just the beginning of their politician's working day.

yes the paper is put to bed late. every single fucking time.

Ore said...

Hmmm, I thought it was just me that noticed. 95% of what I read in the papers here is about politics and I know there's a lot more to report.